5 Things I Learned from the Diana Rodgers of Homegrown Paleo

I recently attended a seminar and booking singing with the very inspirational Diana Rodgers – blogger at Sustainable Dish and author of The Homegrown Paleo Cookbook. Not only does she own her own nutrition practice, but she lives on an organic farm where she raises her own animals and grows her own produce.

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In her newest book, she speaks about the process of farm to table paleo. Her book includes, “how-tos to inspire anyone to have a healthy, balanced lifestyle and a closer connection to their food—whether you live in a house in the suburbs, a farmhouse in the countryside, or an apartment in the city. The Homegrown Paleo Cookbook shows you how.” I personally hope to have a small farm someday where I can grow my own fresh vegetables and maybe even raise some chickens. My Uncle has a small garden is his back yard where he grows lots of vegetables – nothing like eating a fresh salad!

I have been educating myself and leading a gluten free and paleo lifestyle for the past 3 years. I’m not a nutritionists or a certified RD, but I do see myself as being pretty knowledgable about food and how it makes me feel. It’s people like Diana that allow others to learn about what’s going on in their body and what they can maybe do to start feeling better. I learn something new everyday about food, and I love continuing to educate myself by reading blogs and books from authors like Diana.

Here are five new things I learned from Diana’s seminar:

  • Fruit isn’t always the best option if you are looking to lose weight. If you do want to eat fruit, go for the seasonal berries.
  • Breakfast doesn’t always have to be “breakfast foods.” Breakfast is one of my favorite meals of the day, and although I do enjoy my eggs, I always look to pair it with some type of meat like steak, lamb or ground turkey. Diana says that look at breakfast as more of a “meal” rather than “oh it’s the morning so I have to eat breakfast foods.”
  • “Brown rice isn’t ideal not because it takes longer to break it down, but because it has more anti-nutrients (the bran, the part that makes it brown) which can block absorption of minerals and cause irritation. White rice is simply a polished version without the bran and is more easily digested by most, but not all, people.”- DR
  • Omega-3 rich foods help reduce inflammation. Omega-3 are healthy fats that can be found in foods like salmon.
  • “Regarding omega-6’s, our bodies do need some so the idea is not to eliminate them, but to dramatically cut down of foods containing them in high ratios to omega-3’s, because the average American eats about 20 times more than they need. So, look for foods rich in a better ratio of omega 3’s to 6’s.” – DR

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Thank you again to WholeFoods Lynnfield Market Place for hosting us! They always do a wonderful job with these events. We even had the opportunity to meet the Chef who creates the daily paleo options for the food bar. She gave us a little “taste” to take home!

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2 Comments

  1. Hey thanks so much for this post – it was nice to meet you. Because I’m a little bit of a nutrition geek, I wanted to just add a few points to clarify. You got it almost right, but I think you misheard just a couple of things:

    Brown rice isn’t ideal not because it takes longer to break it down, but because it has more anti-nutrients (the bran, the part that makes it brown) which can block absorption of minerals and cause irritation. White rice is simply a polished version without the bran and is more easily digested by most, but not all, people.

    Tuna isn’t really a great source of omega-3’s. Salmon is though.

    Regarding omega-6’s, our bodies do need some so the idea is not to eliminate them, but to dramatically cut down of foods containing them in high ratios to omega-3’s, because the average American eats about 20 times more than they need. So, look for foods rich in a better ratio of omega 3’s to 6’s. It would be impossible to eliminate them.

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